AlliedFamilies

The Chappell Family

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Revised 6/15/2010

Descendants of Robert Chappell

Robert Chappell was born between 1540 – 1560 in England, and died in England.  The Chappells were from Rutland, Northamptonshire and Nottinghamshire.  The children of Robert Chappell were:

William Chappell, was born in 1582, England and died in1649, in Cambridge, England.  He was Bishop of Cork and a professor at Cambridge.

John Chappell was born in 1588 in England, and died in 1612 in Mansfield, England.  He married Mary Barker.  John died before his elder brother and left a young family.

The children of John Chappell and Mary Barker

John Chappell, was born before 1612, Mansfield, England.  On May 28, 1635 the Speedwell of London, John Chappell master, departed from Gravesend, England for Virginia.  In August Captain John Chappell arrived at Jamestown.  His sojourn in Virginia was brief and evidently his only voyage, and may well have been in preparation for the arrival of Thomas Chappell later that same year aboard the America.

That same year John Chappell, age 38, arrived aboard the Assurance and four years later Robert Chappell arrived aboard the Christian.  John and Robert established a separate branch of Chappells seated in Warwick County north of the James River.  It is unclear, but they would seem to be cousins to John and Thomas of Mansfield. This John Chappell would have been born in 1597 and was therefore not a son of John Chappell born in 1588.

Thomas Chappell, born in 1612, Mansfield, England and he died in1658, in Charles City County, Virginia.  He married Hulday.  Thomas Chappell, age 23 ( one source states 33, see note* below), arrived in Virginia around November of 1635 aboard the America captained by William Barker.  At Jamestown, it was verified that Thomas had been certified by the Minister at Gravesend to his conformity to the orders and disciplines of the Church of England after which Thomas journeyed thirty miles up the James River and settled on land patented that November by Captain William Barker. This patent was for 400 acres as 8 headrights, on the south side of the James River opposite Westover.  The patent reads …grant unto William Barker, Mariner, Fower Hundred acres of Land scituated, lying, and being in Charles Cittie County and bounded upon a creek called Chappell’s Creek, south into the woods.  East along the River adjoing upon Merchant’s Hope… It is unclear whether the Creek had been named by John Chappell, Captain of the Speedwell, or by Barker.  A short distance east of this tract was Barker’s Creek.

Merchant’s Hope became the County Seat of Prince George County.  In 1656 Merchant’s Hope Church was built by the London and Virginia Company one mile from the James River and on the edge of Chappell’s Creek.  Thomas Chappell, possibly this Thomas, was a member of the London Company.  The church was brick with thick heavy walls and an arched roof.  The court house was built on the opposite side of Chappell’s Creek.

According to the records of Charles City Court 1656-1661:  Walter Darnham, who married the widow of Thomas Chappell, before October, 1658, was ordered to pay to the orphans of Thomas Chappell, what was due them according to the noncupative will of Thomas Chappell, as testified to my Mr. Edd ffitzgarald and mr fferd: Aston, and that he provide for them and educate them until they reached maturity, and …give good Caution for performance thereof.

The records of Charles City Court 1658-1661 note: Edd ffitzgarald swore that before the death of Thomas Chappell, he was at Chappell’s house when Chappell sent for mr fferd: Aston and declared before them as his last will that each of his children should receive two breeding cattle, and his lands should go to his eldest son, and the rest to his wife.  He appointed Aston as overseer of his children and their estate in the event of any misuse.  This testimony was dated 1658.  Fernando Aston also swore the same and added that the day before Thomas Chappell died, he sent again for Aston, and stated he was to care for the children and their estate.

As part of a deed filed in Charles City County, and found in the record books covering 1737-1774 is the following:

Sir William Berkeley, Knight, Governor of Virginia, by patent to Thomas Newhouse, 100 acres, beginning at Pond’s line. I Hulday Chappell engage that he, said John Lanier, shall peaceably enjoy said land which was mine by my husband’s deed of gift.  Winessed James Binford and William Edmunds and Signed with her mark Hulda Chapple.  Thomas Chappell, for 800 pounds tobacco, releases to John Lanier the land sold to him by Huldy Chappell.  There is also 25 acres besides the 100, next to John Martin.  Said Thomas’s wife shall acknowledge same, Once 1, 1689.  Witnessed James Minge, Sgt. Jooll and signed by Thomas Chappell and Elizabeth Chappell.

*Note: If Thomas Chappell, who arrived aboard the “America” with Captain Barker as master was 33 years of age, he could not then have been a son of John Chappell and Mary Barker, having been born in 1602, when John was but 14 years of age.  It would seem then that he would have most likely been a son of William, Bishop of York, and brother to John who married Mary Barker. What is clear is this was an interrelated family of Chappell’s and Barkers, who were mariners.  That same year, a John Chappell, age 38, arrived in Virginia aboard the Assurance. He, along with Robert, who arrived in 1639, settled in Warwick County and established a separate branch of Chappells.

Thomas Chappell and Hulday were the parents of Thomas Chappell born after 1637 in Charles City County.  It is also clear there were orphans of Thomas Chappell indicating they were the parents of other children, but there is no record of any other than their son Thomas Chappell.

Thomas Chappell and Mary Banister

Thomas Chappell was born after 1637 in Charles City.  He married Mary Banister before 1661, the daughter of John Banister and Joan.  Att a Cor’tt holden in Westover April 9, 1661, Thomas Chappell acknowledgeth in Cor’tt to have received of James Wallis, who married ye relict of Lieut. John Banister dec’d, one legacy given by ye said Banister to ye said Chappell’s child by will and discharged by ye said Wallis fully from ye bond, being three cows and one heyfer.  It is ordered by ye cor’tt that Thomas Chappell give bond to ye Cor’tt for ye cattle bequethed to his child by ye said last will and testament of John Banister and by him received for her use. James Wallace was the Constable for Merchants Hope in 1661-62.  In October 1665 Thomas Crooke, who stood as security for Thomas Chappell in regards to the cattle belonging by bequest to Chappell’s child, petitioned that he be released and that Chappell furnish new security.

In 1665 Thomas Chappell Sr. received eighty acres.  The land patent reads I Sir William Berkley, Knight, Governor, etc. give and grant unto Thomas Chappell… on the South side of James River and on the North side of Kittawan Creek Beginning at a line that parts John Tate and the said Thomas Chappell’s present land and extending into the wood….

Then at Court in Westover in June of 1678, James Binford petitioned for the delivery of land to his wife Sarah, daughter of Thomas Chappell.  This land had been left by John Banister to his widow Joan during her life, and then to Sarah Chappell.  This land had been held by James Wallace in the right of his wife Joan, widow of John Banister.  Joan was now deceased, and Wallace was agreeable, that the land should pass to Sarah as heir to John Banister.

Thomas Chappell son of Thomas Chappell and Mary Banister

Thomas Chappell was born 1650 in Charles City Co, Virginia, and died Bet. 1703 – 1704 in Charles City Co, Virginia.  He married Elizabeth Jones about 1680 in Charles City County.  She was the daughter of James Jones.

In 1694 Thomas Chappell received a land patent:  …unto Thomas Chappell four hundred and twenty-three acres land luing and being in the county of Charles City on the Otterdam Swamp… for the transportation of nine headrights. Buck, doe, Santall, Mungo, Gerald, Morton, Sarah, Abell, and Sue.  All being African Slaves. This was a 30 pound investment, each slave being worth 4,000 pound of tobacco, and a substantial expense.  In 1694 Thomas was tithed for 423 acres and nine slaves.  In 1701 he was granted 994 acres for twenty headrights.

Thomas died before 1704, as Thomas Taylor gave bond to James Jones, father to Elizabeth, on June 22, 1704, which provided that the children of Thomas Chappell would received their inheritance without Taylor making any claim.  This bond was presented to the court in 1725 upon the death of Elizabeth.

Jones is a common English name, and great care must be taken when tracing any relationship to a family with so common a surname.  By the mid 18th century there were a large number of families with the last name Jones living in Sussex and Prince George Counties. The Albermarle Parish Register lists thirty Jones families between 1738 and 1773, and the Bristol Parish Register lists too many to bother counting.  Only when wills, or deeds, were clear about relationships can any sound conclusions be drawn.  Fortunately the will of James Jones, father to Elizabeth, gives a clear understanding of the marriage of his daughter Elizabeth to Thomas Chappell.

Thomas Chappell died before 1704, as Thomas Taylor gave bond to James Jones, father of Elizabeth, on June 22, 1704, which provided that the children of Thomas Chappell would receive their inheritance without Taylor making any claim.  This bond was presented to the court in 1725 upon the death of Elizabeth.

Thomas and Elizabeth were the parents of, Thomas, James, Mary, Robert and Samuel Chappell.  Tradition would dictate that the order would be as given.  However, it becomes clear that a son should have been named John and we know that James was the youngest son.  A son, named John probably died young.  Robert appears to be a Jones family name as well as a Chappell family name.  It is unclear for whom Samuel was named.

Children of Thomas Chappell and Elizabeth Jones

Thomas Chappell

Thomas Chappell was born in Charles City and died between 1731 and 1736 in Sussex County.  He married Margaret Hunnicutt before 1717.  She was the daughter of Robert Hunnicutt and Margeret Wyche.  Thomas and Mary were members of the White Oak Swamp Meeting House in Prince George County.  Their children were recorded in the meeting records.

In 1719, in the will of his grandfather, James Jones, Thomas was left 100 acres.  In 1722 Thomas sold this tract to William Cooke, who had married his mother’s sister, Rebecca Jones.  In 1722 Thomas patented 345 acres on the south side of the Nottoway River, near his brothers Samuel and James.  Thomas died between 1731 and 1736 as he drops from the church records, including those noting the witnesses in attendance at the marriages of his children.

Thomas and Margaret were the parents of Richard, Ann, John, Margaret who married Aaron Hill in 1731, Rebecca who married Peter Binford in 1731, Thomas, Robert, Benjamin, and Martha who married James Binford in 1751.

Richard Chappell married Elizabeth.  He was born in Prince George County and died in 1735 in Chowan County, North Carolina.  In 1726 Epaphroditus Benton deeded to Richard Chappell 200 acres in Hogg Neck on the South side of Warwick Swamp in Chowan County.   The witnesses to this deed were John and William Freeman.  Richard Chappell’s will was filed in 1735.  His sons were listed as Moses, Micajah and Richard.

John Chappell married Ann Simmons in 1741 in Prince George County.  John and Ann were the parents of Joseph, John, Isaac, Jesse who married Mary Rogerson, and James.  John and his family settled in North Carolina between 1726 and 1744 along with his brothers Robert and Richard.  In the records of the Perquimons Meeting House of the Society of Friends there are numerous references to the Chappell family.  Members lived in Perquimon and Chowan Counties.  A few settled in nearby Bertie County.  The 1790-1800 and 1810 census in Bertie, Perquimons and Chowan Counties lists at least ten Chappell households in each census.  These were all easily identifiable as descendents of the Quaker Chappells.  None however were named Thomas in this area.  Over time a number of the Chappells were disowned by the Society of Friends.  Most frequently this was because they married outside of the society, a common problem throughout the Quaker Faith.  Jesse, John Jr., and Ruth all were disowned for their marriages, while Samuel and James for their misconduct, and John in 1789 for holding slaves.  Samuel was later reinstated and married Mirial Chappell, daughter of Isaac in 1805.

Joseph married Sarah.  They were the parents of Squires, Jonathon, Amos, Nancy, Keziah, and Sarah Chappell.  Joseph died in 1803 in Chowan County, North Carolina.

Isaac was the father of Miriam who married her cousin Samuel Chappell in 1805 in Chowan County, North Carolina.

John Chappell married Mary Henby.  They were the parents of Joseph, Samuel who married his cousin Miriam, Gideon, James, John, Lydia, Ruth, and Hudah Chappell. John died in 1802 in Chowan County, North Carolina.

Robert Chappell married Elizabeth Wood, the daughter of Edward Wood.  Robert died in 1774 in Perquimons County, North Carolina.  In 1734 Edward Wood gave to Robert Chappell and his son Jonathon Chappell and Mary Rutter, fifty acres on the north side of Warwick Swamp as well as all his moveable estate in Chowan County, North Carolina.  Mary Rutter was Edward Wood’s daughter.  Robert’s will was filed in Perquimons County in 1774.  His sons were given as Malachi, John, Robert, Job and Mark.  His daughters were Miriam Roberts, Rhoda and Hannah.

Benjamin Chappell married Agnes Binford in 1754 in Prince George County.  Benjamin Chappell was reimbursed in 1744 by the Society of Friends …for his suffering in having had taken from him, by the High Sheriff, for Muster fines and penalties, a feather bed and 200 pounds of tobacco. As a Quaker, Benjamin refused to participate in the militia a service required of every able bodied man.  Later, in 1757, Benjamin’s would sign a petition requesting relief from Military service for members of the Friends, because of the religious views on their society. When the Revolution broke out, his son and namesake, enlisted in Dinwiddie County and served three years fighting against the British.  In 1792 in Brunswick, Benjamin’s sons signed a manumission freeing all their slaves in response to a Quaker determination that slave holding violated the tenants of Christianity.  In 1794, James Binford of Northampton County, North Carolina issued a deed to Thomas, Benjamin Jr., John, Agnes and Aquilla Chappell.  The deed indicates they were the heirs to Benjamin Chappell Sr.  Benjamin, Jr. was a fighting Quaker.  He enlisted in Dinwiddie County during the Revolution and served three years.  At the turn of the century there was an exodus of Virginia Quakers to the Northwest Territory.  It appears that Benjamin Chappell went there about 1805.  Perhaps he received a land warrant for his service in the Revolution.  His 93 year old widow, Lydia, was living in Lake County, Ohio in 1841 where she received a pension for his Revolutionary service.

James Chappell

James Chappell was born May 10, 1694 in Charles City and he died February 12, 1769 in Sussex County.  He was married twice.  His first wife was Elizabeth Howell.  She died September 20, 1744 and he married Elizabeth Briggs the daughter of Henry Briggs and Elizabeth Lucas.

James Chappell was named after his grandfather James Jones, who managed the estate of Thomas Chappell for the benefit of the young Chappell children.  James received his inheritance in 1715, the year he came of age.  His grandfather, James Jones died in 1719, so he had no further assistance from this able gentleman.  Despite this, and probably because of the influence and guidance during his growing up from his well to do grandfather, James became the wealthiest of his family. James served as vestryman of Sussex County.

There were a number of land patents granted to James Chappell in Surry and Sussex Counties.  In 1725 he obtained 200 acres.  Then in 1730 he obtained 350 acres, then 135 acres.  In 1741 another 270 acres was secured.  In 1746 he registered 68 acres, in 1755 another 636 acres, and in 1760 another 150 acres.   He died February 12, 1769.

Will of James Chappell written in 1768, and filed in March, 1769.

In the name of God Amen I James Chappell of the County of Sussex and Parish of Albermarle being old and infim of Body but of Sound and Disposing Mind and Memory on this day, it being the thirt-first Day of October in the Year of Our Lord Crist one thousand seven hundred and sixty eight make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in the manner and from following.

First I commend my soul into the hands of Almight God after this painful life and my body to be Decently buried at the Discretion of my executors hereafter named and touching such worldly estate as it hat pleased Almightly God to bestow upon me I give and divise in the manner following.

I give to my son James Chappell Privilege to get Timber off of the Plantation I now live on, for the use of his plantation, During his life.  I also give my said son, James Chappell, one negro man called Ben and my part of the Brandy Still.  Also one feather bed and furniture, my gray mwere, bridle, and saddle and my great Bible.

I give to my son Thomas Chappell seventy pounds current money.  I give to my daughter Elizabeth Mason one Negro girl named Sarah, one negro boy called Davy and 20 shillings to buy her a mourning ring.

I give to my daughter Mary Gee two negro girls called Hannah and Sealy and 20 shillings to buy her a ring.

I give to my daughter Sarah Mason one negro girl named Pegg and one negro man called Jacoborn in

I give to my daughter Rebecca Northington one negro man called Dick and one negro girl called Judy.

I give to my grandson Thomas Tatum, if he should live to the age of twenty one years, forty five pound of my money in the hands of James Smith to be paid out by my executors for as likely a Negro girl as can be bought in two years from my death.  But my will and desire is that if my grandson Thomas Tatum should die before he comes to the age of twenty- one years then the said forty five pounds or negro and Increase, if any, go to my grandson Howell Tatum and his Heirs.

I give to my daughter Amy Smith all the residue of my money in the hands of James Smith after paying the forty five pounds to my Executors for the use of my grandson Thomas Tatum.

I give to son John Chappell one negro man called Roger and the Plantation whereon he now lives containing 240 acres.  Also one feather bed and furniture.

I give to my daughter Lucretia Carter one negro woman called Sucky, one negro girl called Nan, one Iron Pott, one Gray horse and three cows and calves.

I give to my daughter Lucretia Carter, provided she has any Child living at her Death two negro Girls which she has now in her possession called Priss and Milley.  But my will and desire is that if my said daughter Lucretia Carter dies without any one living that then the Negroes Priss and Milley be sold and the money arising from them be equally divided among my other five daughters.

I give to my son Howell and to his heirs forever, the land and Plantation where he now lives containing 350 acres more or less.  I also give him on negro woman called Patt, and he increase, and one negro boy called Steve.

I give the Plantation whereon I now live, containing 368 acres, to my grandson James Chappell and his heirs forever.

I give to my grandson Henry Chappell, son of my son James, all my land lying on Major’s Branch containing 370 acres.

I give to my grandson Howell Chappell, son of my son John, one negro by named Natt.

I give to my granddaughter Mary Chappell daughter of my son Thomas one negro girl Kate.

My will and desire that all the residue of my estate be sold and the money arising from the sale be divided equally between my sons James, Thomas, John,

and Howell and my granddaughter Mary Chappell, daughter of my son Thomas.

Lastly, I do nominate and appoint my sons James, Thomas, John and Howell Executors….”

Witnesses:  David Jones, John Mason Jr. and William Hunt

The estate of James Chappell was appraised at 970 pounds.  Included in the inventory of James Chappell’s estate were: 4 horses, 63 hoggs, 27 sheep, 100 barrels of Indian Corn, 165 yards of Virginia cloth, 12 leather bottom chairs, 6 rush bottom chairs, a parcel of books, 5 beds and furniture, 10 geese and 2 spinning wheels and a large number of farm implements.

This was a substantial estate.  Most inventories in the period 1760 to 1772 in Sussex came in at less than 100 pound in value.  There were a few for 500 to 600 pounds.  The wealthiest citizen who died during this period was Mr. John Edmunds, Gentleman, whose estate was valued at 2,244 pounds.  His inventory contained a large library of books on law, theology, and literature which we may speculate were circulated amongst his neighbors when they needed to debate the finer issues of the day.  Mr. Edmunds died in 1770.

James Chappell and Elizabeth Howell were the parents of Thomas, James Mary, Amy, Henry, John, Robert, Sarah, and Anne Chappell.  Elizabeth Briggs and James were the parents of Elizabeth Chappell who was born in 1723.   Mary died in September, 1758.  Henry died in 1779.  Robert died in 1795 in Richland County, South Carolina.  Anne married Peter Tatum who was born in 1742.  Lucretia married a Carter. Howell died in 1805.

The Children of James Chappell and Elizabeth Howell, and Elizabeth Briggs

Thomas Chappell married Mary Briggs, the daughter of William Briggs and Mary Cooke.  He died in 1790 in Lunenburg County, Virginia.  Thomas was the eldest son.  He married in 1744 and in that year James and Elizabeth Chappell deeded to him a tract of land in Isle of Wight County.  This area later became Southampton County.  Thomas and his family eventually settled in Lunenburg County where his will was filed in 1790.  In 1749 William Briggs left his daughter Mary Chappell a  … Negro, Prayer book, furniture, etc…. in his will.

Thomas and Mary were the parents of Thomas, James, John, William, Anna, Mary, Sarah Briggs, and Elizabeth.  Thomas and Mary, of Southampton, conveyed to James Chappell of the same county, 153 acres bought by Thomas Chappell.  James sold this tract in 1775.  He was noted in Southampton as late as 1810 however.  Sarah Briggs Chappell married William Ellis in 1780, in Lunenburg County.  Elizabeth died in Dinwiddie County about 1790.

Thomas married Elizabeth Malone, the daughter of William Malone, in 1771 in Southampton County, Virginia.  In 1771 Thomas and wife Mary of Southampton, deeded to Thomas Chappell, Jr. part of a tract patented in 1747 by Thomas Senior. This probably was a wedding gift.  In 1775 Thomas moved to Charlotte County Virginia and 1775 a deed was recorded for the sale of his land in Southampton.  Thomas served in the Revolution from Charlotte County and after the Revolution he went to Sussex County.  Thomas is said to have been extremely prosperous.  In 1783 and in 1789 he sold his land in Lunenburg County which adjoined the land of his brother John.  Thomas with his brother William conveyed a tract of land on Springfield Creek in Lunenburg in 1790 as executors for the estate of Thomas Chappell. In 1792 they sold another tract on Bears Element in Lunenburg.  The children of Thomas and Elizabeth were Robert, an invalid who never married, Lucretia married a Randolph, Pheobe married a Rainey, Martha married an Anderson, Mary married a Malone, and Sarah married a Green.

John Chappell married first Julia Gayle, and second, Mary Hays.  His third wife was Sarah Shelton.  John and Julia settled in Lunenburg County.  In 1789 they sold their tract in Lunenburg to Asa Davis of Amelia County.  In 1793 John Chappell and wife Mary sold a tract of land on Ledbetter Creek, and a tract on Flat Rock Creek in Lunenburg.  John was a Methodist Minister and preached in a church built on his plantation at his own expense.  He was a successful businessman and had large land and slave holdings.  He was also a skilled blacksmith.  He resided in Brunswick and Mecklenburg Counties.  John was the father of Lucretia, Sarah, Frances, Josiah, and Richard.

William was born in Southampton County and died in Lunenburg County.  In 1780 he was deeded a tract of land by his parents in Lunenburg.  William with his brother Thomas conveyed a tract of land on Springfield Creek in Lunenburg in 1790 as executors for the estate of Thomas Chappell.  In 1792 they sold another tract on Bears Element in Lunenburg.  William was the father of William, Thomas, and John who were noted in Dinwiddie in 1810.

Anna Chappell married Daniel Malone and then a Robertson.  Anna and Daniel were the parents of William, Thomas, Mary, Sally and Rebecka Malone. Rebecka married John Andrews, son of Mark Andrews and Winifred Lyell.  John was born in 1764 in Dinwiddie County.  Their children were Nancy who married John Ragsdale in 1806, in Williamson County Tennesse; Tapley Andrews who married Nancy Ragsdale; Sally Andres, born in 1786, who married Robert Ragsdale,  Mary Winifred Andrews, Andrew L. Andrews who married Elizabeth Hardaway Andrews and removed to Clark County, Arkansas; Lucy Rebecca Andres, Elizabeth Andrews who married John McCurdy, and  Robert Lyle Andrews.

Mary Chappell married a Clay and they were the parents of Thomas Chappell Clay.

Elizabeth Chappell married William Anderson January 13, 1762 in Southampton County, Virginia.  She later married a Fowler in 1775 in Dinwiddie County.  Elizabeth and William Anderson were cousins.  Elizabeth and Fowler were the parents of Sarah, Wilmouth, and Mary Briggs Fowler.

James Chappell, Jr. married Judith Rives the daughter of William Rives and Priscilla.  He then married Mary, and after her death Elizabeth Briggs in 1744 in Sussex County, the daughter of William Briggs and Mary Cooke. In his will in 1748, William Briggs left to his daughter Elizabeth Chappell a …Negro, furniture, and horses she is possessed of.

James received 240 acres in Sussex from his father in 1757.  In 1765 his father gave him another 230 acres and in 1767 366 acres, some being part of the 1755 tract of 300 acres on Raccoon Swamp in Sussex.

James Chappell, Jr. died in Sussex County in 1778.  In his will, all of his children, except John were mentioned.  James and Judith Rivers were the parents of Martha.  James and Elizabeth were the parents of Henry, Elizabeth who married Philip Reekes, James, Mary, John, Amy, Rebecca, William and Benjamin.

Henry was born in 1751 in Sussex County.  He married Elizabeth Mason Rives the daughter of Christopher Rives and Elizabeth Mason.  Henry received 170 acres on Major’s Branch in the 1769 will of his grandfather James Chappell.  Henry and Elizabeth were the parents of Parmelia who married Thomas Chappell, who was born in 1772 in Sussex County.  Henry and Elizabeth were also the parents of Elizabeth Mason Chappell who married John Briggs in 1799, Sarah Chappell who married a Wills, and Henry Chappell who died in 1826 and never married.

James was born in 1746 in Sussex County and died in 1818 in Sussex County.  He married Sarah Hines in 1769.  In 1768 his father conveyed 150 acres.  His will lists three sons and a daughter.  Their children were James, and Littlebury who was born November 21, 1772 in Sussex County. Littlebury married Claramond Dobie in 1802 in Sussex County.  James and Sarah were also the parents of Edmund, Rebecca Parham Chappell who married Stephen Lucas, Elizabeth, Mary, and Sarah Chappell.

Mary Chappell was born about 1747.  She married Sterling Neblett in Lunenburg County.  Their daughter Dolly Neblett married William Dobie.

William Chappell was born in 1763 and married first Sarah Fowler in 1803 in Sussex, and after her death he married Patsy Bonner in 1804 in Sussex.  William was a soldier in the Revolution.

Benjamin is listed in the Albermarle Parish Register as the son of James, but his mother is not given.  Benjamin married Sarah Redding.

Mary Chappell married Charles Gee, son of James Gee and Boyce Scott.  Mary died in September, 1788.  Charles had died a few years before.  Mary and Charles had a large family. They were the parents of Elizabeth, Mary, Rebecca, James, Sarah, John, Chappell, Howell, Charles, Boyce, and Henry Gee.

Elizabeth Gee married John Potts Oct. 14, 1786.

Mary Gee married William Harrison in 1704 in Sussex County.  They lived in Prince George County.  Their children included Gee Harrison born about 1841.

Rebecca Gee married a Parham.

James Gee died November 12, 1777 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as a soldier in the Revolution.  His will was filed after the Revolution, where he lived in 1783 in Halifax NC, Will Bk. 3 p. 44.

Sarah Gee was born August 22, 1743 in Prince George County.  She married Colonel Timothy Rives son of Timothy Rives.  Colonel Rives was born about 1740 in Virginia and died in 1802 in Prince George County.  Colonel Rives and Sarah were the parents of Briggs Rives, born September 10, 1762 in Prince George County where he died in 1810, Timothy Rives, and John Rives, and Judith Rives who was born in 1765 in Prince George County.  Judith married John Gee, son of Charles Gee and Elizabeth Dobie.  John and Judith settled in Darlington County, South Carolina.  He became a Justice of the Peace and was a large planter and grist mill operator.  The mill pond still belongs to other members of the family.  He also owned several lots in the town of Darlington, shortly after that “new” town was being laid out around the Court House in 1806.  No doubt, for purposes of speculation.  His son Edmund later lived in Darlington and Pleasant had a general store in Darlington.  (Horace F. Ruidsill).  Their family is traced in Gees ’n More.  Briggs Rives married Anne Cureton on December 23, 1798.  She was born January 21, 1765 in Virginia. Briggs and Ann were the parents of Francis Everard Rives, born in 1792, in Prince George County, Elizabeth Cureton Rives born October 17, 1799.  Elizabeth married Hartwell Peebles Heath on November 19, 1818.  Their family is traced in The Heath Family.  Sarah Gee Rives, daughter of Briggs and Ann, was born in 1795.  Sarah married William Shands, son of William Shands and Lucy Oliver.  William was born in 1787 and died in 1860.  William Shands and Sarah Gee Rives were the parents of William Briggs Shands, born in 1820 who married Letitia Tyler, daughter of President John Tyler and Aurelius Rives Shands who married Sarah Martha Wood.   General Shands wrote that his aunt, Mrs. Elizabeth Heath lost 3 sons in the Civil War.

John Gee was born January 18, 1744/45 in Sussex County.  He married Boyce Ivey.  John and Boyce were the parents of James Scott Gee, Susannah Gee who married a Williams, and Henry Gee who died April 28, 1845 in Prince George County.

Chappell Gee died before November, 1777 inn Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the Revolution.  His will was written November 12, 177 and filed in 1783 in Halifax County, North Carolina.  He married Rebecca Lucas on March 18, 172 in Sussex County.  Chappell was the father of Martha Gee who was born in Northampton County, North Carolina.  She married Joshua parsons in 1804 in Sussex County, Virginina.

Howell Gee died in 1788 in Northampton County. Howell was granted land in 1788 in Henry County Tennessee (Grant No. 9102, 560).  Howell’s will was probated in Northampton County.  Jesse Dupree, his friend, inherited his property.  Jesse was the son-in-law of his uncle Col. Drury Gee.

Charles Gee, died in 1829, and had frequent interactions with the Gee family residing first in Northampton, then in Halifax County.  Charles married Susannah Peebles December 12, 1787 in Sussex County.  She was a daughter of Mary Peebles.  Charles and Susannah were the parents of Therina, Edmund, Charles, Thomas, Theron, and William Gee.

Boyce Gee married John Powell September 6, 1780 in Sussex County.  He died in 1798.  Boyce and John were the parents of John, Amy, Elizabeth, Rebecca, and Abram Powell.

Henry Gee married Sally Felts on Jan. 13, 1802 in Sussex.   Giving a power of attorney to William Call, Jr. on April 10, 1790, Henry sold land in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.

Amy Chappell married Joshua Tatum the son of Christopher Tatum and Bridget Scott about 1745-50.  Amy and Joshua went to Northampton County, North Carolina where Joshua died in 1765.  Amy then married James Smith.  The children of Amy and Joshua Tatum were Thomas, Howell, James, Christopher, Joshua, Elizabeth, Mary, and Sarah.  Thomas Tatum received an inheritance from his grandfather James Chappell which was held in safe keeping by his step-father James Smith until he was 21.  Howell was born in 1757 and he married Henrietta Orgain.  Howell served in the North Carolina Continental Line as an Ensign and Captain from 1777 to 1781.  He was a prisoner at Charleston when the city fell.  He received a bounty of land in Tennessee for his service and moved there. Howell Tatum had a distinguished career.  He was the Treasurer of the Western District of Tennessee, Attorney General and Judge of the Tennessee Supreme Court and in the War of 1813 he was a Major of the Tennessee Volunteers and General Andrew Jackson’s topographical engineer.  James Tatum also served in the North Carolina Continental Line as a Lieutenant and was a prisoner at the fall of Charleston.  Mary Tatum married a Smith and Sarah Tatum married Rhodam Rollins.

Henry Chappell was born in 1732 and he married Elizabeth Hicks in Brunswick County, Virginia.  Henry removed to the Camden District of South Carolina.

Philip Chappell in his genealogy of the Chappell family gives some wonderful family stories about many of the Chappells.  In 1895 a family reunion was held in Atlanta, where he took notes, writing down what he was told.  Regarding the Chappells of South Carolina he writes …there is a difference, some discrepancy between the traditions and the records as to dates of the birth of the children of Robert and time of removal to South Carolina. This is true because Mr. Chappell did not have available to him the will of Henry Chappell, filed in South Carolina in 1779.  He therefore confused the members of families, and this caused the dates to be irregular.  Henry and his brother Robert both settled in the same area of South Carolina.  Henry also had a son named Robert.

Henry Chappell clearly is a son of the elder James Chappell and his wife Elizabeth Howell.  The name Henry occurs only among the descendents of this James Chappell.  He had three grandsons named Henry, the oldest being born in 1751.  Evidently they were namesakes of Henry Chappell, and Henry Howell.

In 1765 Henry Chappell of Brunswick sold to John Howard 235 acres which the deed notes were originally granted to James Chappell in 1725.  In his will in 1768, James does not leave this acreage to any of his heirs, and does not mention Henry.  It would seem that Henry received this acreage before James died in Henry married Elizabeth Hicks (Hix) in Brunswick.

In 1771 Henry received a land patent in South Carolina, but it is clear from his will that he had been in the region for some time, as he held quite a substantial estate, including two plantations.

Will of Henry Chappell, filed in 1779, at Kershaw Court, Camden District

Wife Elizabeth 1/3 of the land, likewise Mingo, Charles, Roger, Will, Lucy and 2 plows and 7 breeding sows during her life.  To my wife Elizabeth Chappell my crop of tobacco and corn, to her heirs and assigns forever.

To my son Hicks Chappell one Negro Sambo, one Negro woman named Judy, on Negro girl named Camsher, and half of the Stock that is at my Quarter….  Likewise the third of the Crop made on that place, likewise half of two Mares and the third of Hogs on my Home Plantation and the half of the Household furniture at my Quarters, likewise 8,000 pounds to be paid out of the money I now have. (Note: this was most certainly South Carolina Script which was highly inflated in 1779 due to the Revolution.)

Son Robert  8,000 pounds at interest, 2 cows, calves, Jem and Jack, Negroes.

To John, 12,000 pound at interest….

To son Henry 12,000 pounds at interest….

To daughters Elizabeth Sneade and Martha Love 8,000 pounds at interest each.

To John and Henry, my land….

Henry and Elizabeth Hicks were the parents of Hicks (Hix), Henry, John, Robert, Elizabeth, and Martha.

Hicks was born in 1759 in Brunswick and he died in 1823 in Richland County, South Carolina.  He served under Colonel Taylor during the Revolution.   Hicks married Elizabeth Thwaites (Threewits).   According to Heitman, Hicks Chappell served under Goodwyn and Thomson in the Revolution.  He was captured at Ft. McIntosh and then exchanged.  Joining Sumter under Lt. Colonel Thomas Taylor, he was captured again at Fishing Creek. Exchanged, he was promoted to Captain under Taylor.  Serving with him under Goodwyn was Robert Chappell, his brother.  The will of Hicks Chappell was filed in 1823 in Richland County, South Carolina.  He was a Major in the militia after the Revolution.  His gravestone states that Hicks was born in 1759 in Brunswick.  Family tradition states he entered as a private under Sumter and General Marion, was wounded at Eutaw Springs and exited as a Major, but this is probably an embellishment as it seems evident he obtained his rank after the Revolution.  Hicks and Elizabeth were the parents of James Henry Chappell and John Chappell born in 1782 in Richland County, South Carolina.  John married Sophia Maria Green. John settled on the Little River in Fairfield County, South Carolina.  His wife was a daughter of Colonel Green of the Revolution.  In 1837 he bought a plantation in Lowndes County, Alabama where he died in 1871. John was soldier and a Statesman as well as a lawyer and Congressman.  He was in business with John C. Calhoun.  In 1812 he commanded a South Carolina Regiment.

Elizabeth Chappell married a Sneade, and Martha Chappell married a Love in 1775.  According to a family tradition reported by Phillip Chappell, Martha was taken to Lunenburg by her husband when the Revolutionary War broke out in South Carolina, while he returned and enlisted in the militia.

John Chappell married Mary Hines in 1758 in Sussex County, Virginia.  In 1750 John received 290 acres from his father.  John and Mary lived in Sussex and were the parents of Howell born in 1759, Martha born in 1761, John born in 1763, William born in 1765, Elizabeth born in 1767, Mary born in 1769, Thomas born in 1772, Henry born in 1774, and Peggy.

Howell Chappell was born in 1759 in Sussex County.  He died in Mecklenburg County.  Howell went first to Prince George County then in 1783 he purchased 100 acres in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County from William Ezell.  Eventually he settled in Mecklenburg County where he received a deed in 1803 from his aunt, Rebecca Northington.  Stephen and Frances Chappell were his children.  Frances married  a Roberts.

John Jr., died unmarried in 1808 in Greensville County, Virginia.  In his will he freed his slaves and gave his plantation to the poor in the county.  He directed that his personal property be sold and the residue given to Stephen Chappell and Frances Chappell Roberts, the children of his brother, Howell.

Thomas married Parmelia Chappell.

Robert Chappell was born in 1732 in Sussex and died in 1795 in Richland County, South Carolina.  Robert was married two times. His first wife was Agnes Cross, the daughter of William Cross of Brunswick.  They were married in 1759.  He then married Nancy in South Carolina.  According to the records of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Robert was born in 1732 and died in 1795.  His will was filed in Richland County.  His first wife Agnes Cross died shortly after their arrival in South Carolina and Robert married Nancy.

It would seem that Robert was also the father of Laban Chappell born in 1762 and John born in 1771.

Laban was born in 1762 in Richland County, South Carolina. He served as a private under Sumter during the Revolution in Colonel Thomson’s Regiment.  It is stated that he and his brother were caught and sentenced to be shot but escaped while ill with small pox.  It is unknown if this brother was Robert, born on 1732, or another unknown sibling.  Laban owned 672 acres in the Orangeburg District evidently in the area which became Lexington County, adjacent to Richland County.  Laban married Margaret Sprigner Adams in 1789 in Richland County.    They were the parents of John L. born in 1794 who married Grace H. Goodwin in 1812; Mary, born in 1798; and Laban Henry Chappell who married Martha Love in 1830.  Laban, Sr.  died in Orangeburg District, Lexington County, South Carolina.

John Chappel was born in 1771 and married Sybill Scott in 1816 in Orangeburg District, Lexington County, South Carolina.  Their children were John H. R. Chappell, Laban Christopher Chappell, Nancy Chappell, and Hix Benjamin Chappell.

Sarah Chappell married Christopher Mason the son of John Mason and Elizabeth.  Christopher Mason was deeded land in Brunswick County by his father in 1750.  He served as Sheriff and died there in 1778.  Christopher and Sarah Mason were the parents of Christopher, Elizabeth who married a Speed, Henry, John, Joseph who married Elizabeth Watson, Martha who married a Johnson, Sarah, Sterling, and Isaac Mason.

Howell Chappell was born in 1744 in Sussex County where he died in 1805.  He first married Rebecca Smith and then he married Lucy Briggs the daughter of William Briggs and Mary Cooke.  Mary died before 1763.  Howell and Rebecca were the parents of Henry, James, William, Susannah, Zilpah Coker, Frances, Briggs, Elizabeth and Howell.

Elizabeth Chappell was born in 1723.  She married John Mason about 1740.  He was the son of John Mason and Elizabeth.  In 1740 John Mason was vestryman of Albermarle Parish and became a Major in the Militia in 1763.  From 1777 to 1783 he was one of the Gentlemen Justices of Sussex County, which was partitioned from Surry County.

Elizabeth and John Mason were the parents of John born in 1741, Elizabeth, James, Henry, Rebecca, William, David, Joseph, and Peyton Mason.

John Mason, Jr. was born in 1741 and he died in 1802 in Sussex County.  He married Elizabeth Gee, daughter of James Gee and Boyce Scott and Jane Parham, who evidently was the mother of his children Elizabeth and John Raines Mason.  Elizabeth Mason was born in 1772 and she married Benjamin Wyche.  She died in 1817 in Sussex County.  John Raines Mason, born in 1770,  married Sarah Harrison Cargill.

Elizabeth Mason was born in 1742 in Sussex County.  She married Christopher Rives the son of George Rives and Frances Tatum.  Christopher Rives, according to Relique of the Rives by Childs was struck by lightening and killed.  Their daughter was Elizabeth Mason Rives who married Henry Chappell, son of James Chappell and Elizabeth Briggs.

James Mason was born in 1744 in Sussex County and died there.  He married Elizabeth Harrison, daughter of John Harrison and Susanna Edmunds.  Their son was Edmunds Mason who was the father of John Y. Mason, U. S. Senator and Ambassadore to France in 1853 to 1859.  His daughter, Elizabeth Mason married Roscoe Briggs Heath, May 29, 1855.  He was a member of the U.S. Ligation to paris, France.

Henry Mason married his cousin Mary Mason.

Rebecca Mason married Timothy Rives.

William Mason married Mary Gilliam.

David Mason was a Lieutenant, then Captain in the 11th Virginia Regiment in the Revolution.

Benjamin Mason

Lucretia Mason

Joseph Mason died without any children.

Peyton Mason married Pattie Peebles in 1782, then Martha Person in 1802.

Samuel Chappell

Samuel Chappell died in 1749 in Sussex County.   He married Elizabeth Scott, daughter of John Scott and Bethyer Boyce.  In 1696 Samuel patented 218 acres in Prince George County.  In 1722 he was granted 150 acres, as three headrights, in Surry County south of the Blackwater River about twenty-five miles from Merchant’s Hope.  Also in 1722 he was granted, as seven headrights, 345 acres on the south side of Nottoway River in Surry County.  Samuel probably had paid for the importation of ten slaves.

The Will of Samuel Chappell, filed 1749 in Surry County, Virginia

To son, Samuel Chappell, 5 shillings.

To daughter, Elizabeth, 5 shillings.  To son Thomas, 125 acres, part of my land on Occhineachy Neck in North Carolina.

To son James, 125 acres in Occhineachy Neck, North Carolina.

To son John, part of tract I now live on to Deep Bottom, between me and Robert Jones, 130 acres.

To my son Benjamin, 150 acres adjoining where I now live, patented in my own name.  To son Robert, all the remainder of my land I live on, after my wife, Elizabeth’s decease.

To son Drury, 40 shillings.

To daughter Sarah, 5 shillings, to daughter Bethiah, 5 shillings, to daughter Mary, feather bed, to Emelia, 5 shillings.  Remainder not given to be divided between wife and children Mary, Thomas, Nancy, John, James, Benjamin, Drury, Robert.

On November 21, 1749 Elizabeth Chappell presented Samuel’s will and Samuel Peete, Robert Jones and James Chappell swore to its validity.  Samuel wrote his will in 1740 naming his wife and son Thomas as executors.  Thomas was absent from the probate record and evidently had removed to North Carolina before 1749.   Elizabeth’s will was filed in 1761.  She left her estate to Drury, Robert, John and Emelia.

Children of Samuel Chappell and Elizabeth Scott

Daughters Bethiah, Mary, Emelia, and Nancy are untraced.

Elizabeth Chappell married John Heath. She was born about 1718 and died after 1786 in Halifax County, North Carolina.  John Heath was the son of William Heath and Elizabeth Gee of Sussex County.  He was born in 1716 in Sussex County and died in 1765 in Halifax County, North Carolina.  Their family is traced in detail in The Heath Family.   Among their children was Elizabeth.  She was born August 23, 1745 in Sussex County.  She married James Everett Cureton in 1765 in North Carolina, son of Thomas Cureton and Susanna Jones.  James was born in 1739 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina.  Elizabeth and James Cureton were the parents of Jeremiah Cureton, born in 1763 and Betsey Cureton.  Jeremiah Cureton married Nancy Kirk about 1785 in Halifax County, North Carolina.  Their children were Elizabeth, John, William Jackson, Sarah, Jeremiah, Thomas Kirk, and Anna Cureton.  Betsey Cureton was born in North Carolina.  She married Henry Massey.  Their children were James Cureton born in 1785 and he died in Mecklinburg County, North Carolina; Charlotte Massey; William Massey, born in 1788 in Greenville County, Virginia; Rebecca, Henry, Everod, and Betsey Massey.

Thomas Chappell married Mary Gee.  He was born about 1720 in Sussex County and died December, 1763 in Northampton County, North Carolina.  They were married about 1749 in Sussex.  She was the daughter of James Gee and Boyce Scott.  Mary was born about 1720 and died in 1797 in Northampton County, North Carolina.

Thomas was taxed in the 1750-56 Quit Rent Rolls for Northampton County, North Carolina for 250 acres near Jack Swamp which was near the 1,000 acres owned by Captain James Gee and the 300 acres owned by Charles Gee III.  Thomas evidently removed to North Carolina before 1749 as he was absent from the probate proceedings for his father’s will.  In his father’s will Thomas received 125 acres on Occhineachy Neck in Northampton County.  In the will of Captain James Gee, written in 1759 and filed in 1760, Thomas received 158 acres on the north side of the Roanoke River.

The will of Thomas Chappell was filed in 1764 in Northampton County.

In the name of God Amen, I Thomas Chappell of the County of Northampton in the province of North Carolina being sick and weak in Body but of Sound Mind and Memory and calling to mind the uncertainty of man’s life upon Earth have constituted and made this my Last will and Testament in manner and form following, that is to say:

First and principally, I most humbly bequeath my soul to Almighty God that Gave it, hoping through the merits of my beloved Savior Jesus Christ to have Redemption of all my sins and as for Worldly Estate it hath please God in his Mercy to possess me with after my just Debts and funeral expenses be discharged which shall be at the discretion of my Executors hereafter named I give and devise in the manner following:

Imp:  I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Chappell all my lands and plantations lying in this County on Roanoke River, as well (?) low grounds as the plantation whereon I now live they being two tracts at the day of her marriage or the age of twenty one years to her and her heirs forever.  But in case my said Daughter shall die without being lawfully begotten, then in the case I give all the before mentioned Lands to my brother Drury Chappell and his heirs forever.

I give and bequeath to my loving wife Mary Chappell all the remainder of my Estate both of what kind and what place so ever she paying my just debts and funeral expenses and further my will and devise is that my loving wife have the use of the plantation whereon I now live during her life or widowhood and no longer.

And lastly I devise that my Executors may rent out my said low ground plantation as they shall think proper for the advantage of my said child Elizabeth and the profits coming from said rents to be applied to her maintenance at the discretion of my said executors hereafter name died in.

And lastly I do nominate and appoint my loving wife Executrix and my brother John Chappell, John Roper, Mr. Drewry Gee and Mr. William Halle Executors to this my last Will and Testament Disannulling and making void all other and former wills by me made and this only to be read and taken to be my Last Will In witness whereof I have set my hand and seal the 11th day of November 1763.

Thomas Chappell made his mark and the witnesses were Robert Chappell, Susannah Hall, Frances Horn and Ephraim Heath.  His will was proved in February, 1764.

Mary Chappell is the only Chappell recorded in either Northampton or Halifax Counties in the 1790 census.  She lived very close to James Tiller Gee.  The will of Mary Chappell was proved in 1797 in Northampton County.  She lists Robert Chappell, Benjamin Chappell, Keziah Chappell and Elizabeth Chappell.  Nothing is known at this time regarding Elizabeth Chappell their daughter after her mother’s death.

Sarah Chappell married Joseph Heath.  She was born about 1721 and she married Joseph Heath about 1755 in Sussex County.  Joseph was the son of Abraham Heath and Susanna Wren.  The 1782-1786 tax rolls in Prince George County list Sarah Heath and Joseph Heath, evidently her son.  She is shown with 6 slaves.   Their children were Richard, Joseph, and Drury Heath. Their family is traced in The Heath Family.

Samuel Chappell married Elizabeth and after her death he married Mary Tatum.  Samuel was born about 1722 in Sussex County and he died in Northampton County, North Carolina.  Mary Tatum was the daughter of Christopher Tatum and Bridget Scott.  She was born about 1726.  Samuel Chappell was recorded in the Albermarle Parish Register for the birth of his three children: Christopher, Mary and Robert.  In 1750-56 he was listed in the Northampton Quit Rent Rolls for 250 acres near the Roanoke River adjoining that of Captain James Gee’s 250 acres.  Samuel’s death was reported to Reverend Wiley of Albermarle Parish for entry into the register by Richard Wilkerson in 1765.

Samuel and Elizabeth were the parents of Robert, John, and James.  Samuel and Mary were the parents of Christopher, born Oct. 14, 1744, and Mary, born Oct. 2, 1746.

Robert Chappell moved to Wake County, North Carolina with his brother John. The 1800 census lists Mary and Polly Chappell and Samuel, a cousin.  Evidently both Robert and John Chappell died before 1800.  It would seem that among their descendents in Wake County were:

Christopher, born in 1786, who married Sally Mathews in 1814

Daniel, who married Polly Chappell, in 1814

Ancil, who married a Darkis in 1813

Charlotte, who married Alexander Clark in 1820

John, who married Nancy Robertson in 1801

Robert, who married Nancy Avery, in 1816.

Christopher who was born Oct. 14, 1744 married a Harris in Montgomery County, North Carolina, and then a Parks about 1770.  She died in 1772.  Christopher is noted in the 1771-73 tax rolls in Butte County, North Carolina.  This county later became Franklin and Warren Counties.  By 1780 Christopher had removed to Montgomery County where he died in 1836 at age 92.  He was the father of eleven children.  The honorable Joshua Chappell stated, My grandfather Christopher Chappell… had three brothers John, Robert and James and a sister who married a man named Marshall.  Robert and John settled east of here in Wake County or somewhere not far from Raleigh.  James removed to South Carolina. In 1770 Christopher lived in Montgomery County, North Carolina, on the Uwharie River a tributary of the Yadkin River.  Christopher Chappell’s children with Miss Harris were Rolin, Christopher, James, Britton, John, and Wiley. He was also the father of Joshua, Rhoda, Elizabeth and Rebecca.  Christopher and Miss Parks were the parents of Parks born in 1771.   Wiley went to Georgia, as he is listed as a participant in the lottery in 1805 as lot #1701.  John evidently also participated in the Georgia Lottery in 1805 with his brother Wiley.  He was lot # 1705 and received 2 draws indicating he was married.  It is told in the genealogy by Phillip Chappell that John and his wife were slain with an axe by a deranged slave who evidently attacked the entire family. The children survived. James died in the Civil War.  Joshua, who was wounded, became mentally ill and wandered the remainder of his life in Indian Territory.  Eli went to Texas.

Drury Chappell, who was mentioned in the will of his brother Thomas, lived with Thomas and Mary after the death of their parents.  There is little in the record regarding him other than the notation regarding his marriage.  Drury married Sally Sexton in 1802 in Wake County, North Carolina.

John Chappell married Nanny (Nancy).  He was born about 1736 in Sussex County and died after 1785 in Hancock County, Georgia.  He and Nanny were married about 1755 in Halifax County, North Carolina.

John inherited from his father a track of land near Deep Bottom adjacent that of Robert Jones.  In 1764 he was appointed an executor in the will of his brother Thomas Chappell.  This probably indicates he had removed to North Carolina by this date as that is where Thomas lived.  John is recorded for two land purchases in Halifax County between 1761 and 1770.  In 1770 a deed was executed in Granville County, North Carolina by John Chappell and wife Nancy conveying a tract of land in Sussex to William Willis.

John went to Georgia after the Revolution.  In 1785 a land grant was issued in Washington County to John Chappell.  Washington County is next to Hancock County.  John and his family eventually made their home on the Oconee River in Hancock County.  A family tradition states that Joseph Chappell founder of the Chappells of Hancock County came to Georgia in 1790.  Phillip Chappell believes this was the son of John Chappell.  A bible record in Georgia states that Thomas Chappell, of the Hancock County Chappells, was born in Virginia in 1761.  It would seem that this was the son of John and Nanny Chappell whose birth was noted in 1761 in the Albermarle Parish Register in Sussex County.

The 1805 Georgia lottery lists these Chappells for Hancock County:

Benjamin #928, 1 draw

John Sr. #929, 2 draws

John Jr. #927, 2 draws

Joseph #930, 2 draws

Thomas #893, 2 draws

Family tradition states, according to Philip Chappell, that Benjamin died as a young man from a snake bite.  The will of John Chappell was filed in Hancock County in 1807.

Will of John Chappell, Sr.

Will Book D, pp. 319, 328 State of Georgia, Hancock County

In the name of God Amen, know ye that I John Chappell of the State & County aforesaid Now being of sound mind & memory. But old & infirm in Bodily Strength & Calling to mind the mortality of all men & knowing that I have a Natural Death once to Die.—-Do make constitute & ordain this my Last Will & Testament.—-First of all I recommend my soul to God, that gave it me, & my Body to a Decent Burial. Nothing Doubting but I shall receive the same again at the Great Resurrection and that all my just Debts be paid out of my Estate.

1st Item. I lend to my Beloved wife Nanny Chappel During her Natural Life one room of my Dwelling House at the East End thereof. I also lend Her in the same manner the following Moveable Property, first my negroes, Jane, Pol & Henry, two Feather Beds & Furniture with all other Necessary Household Furniture for Her Convenient support to be allowed her out of my Household & Kitchen furniture By my Executors. All of which the aforesaid Property, negroes excepted, after my Beloved wife’s Natural Death, I will to be Equally Divided among my Sons & Daughter, that may be then & at that time Living, & if neither of my Children survives my Beloved Wife Nanny Chappel, It is then my Will that the Legacy that I lend her be Divided in Equal Degree amongst my Grand Children in the first Degree, that may be Living at the time such Distribution shall be subject to take place.

2nd Item. I give & Bequeath to my Beloved Son, Thomas Chappel & his Heirs for forever the following property that is to say, my Land & Plantation whereon he now lives, with three of my negroes, Phill, Jino & Stephen with all the Rest of my Movable Property that I Heretofore lent to Him.____

3rd Item. I give & Bequeath to my Beloved son, John Chappel. My Land & Plantation whereon he now lives the same to Hold agreeable to a Dividing Line that was run by Jonathan Adams, with My Negroes Chaney, Warren, Jino, Nathan, George & Poll. & all the rest of my Moveable Property that I heretofore lent Him.

4th Item. I Give & Bequeath to my Beloved son Benjamin Chappel. My Land & Plantation whereon I now Live with all my Plantation Tools & my Waggon & Geer, with my two mares commonly called Mark & Sorrel. Also two of my Feather Beds with Good Furniture. My Bofet with my Glass & Earthen were & my Looking Glass, one Chest, six sitting chairs & Pine Table. Also my stock of Hogs & Cows in full.–Together with four of my negroes (to wit) Sam, Amy, Peter & Nance and it is further my will that my Beloved son Benjamin Chappel shall take care of & Provide for my Beloved wife Nanny Chappel During her natural Life or widowhood at his own expense.

5th Item. I Give & Bequeath unto my Beloved Daughter Patsey Sledge (a widow) My negro woman Hannah & if the said negro woman Hannah shall hereafter have any Children it is my will that they be Equally Divided between my Daughter Patsey & her three Children, namely Jincy, Betsy & Hiram Sledge, when & at the time that the youngest of the Children before mentioned arrives at Lawful age. If any one of them should arrive to that age. If Neither nor any of her children should live to the age of Puberty nor have any Legitimate Child or Children then and in that Case the said Negro Hannah & her increase as above mentioned when & after My Beloved Daughter Dies this natural Death shall Return to my Lawful Representatives in Equal Degree, and be it known also that I give to my Beloved Grand Children the children of Elizabeth Sledge Dec’d in the sum of Seven Hundred Dollars in Equal Degree the same to be raised by my Executors out of my Estate.

6th Item. I Give to my Beloved Granddaughter Jincy Sledge my negro girl Ann–to be Delivered to her when she arrives to the age of Sixteen Years or marries. Which said Negro Ann is to continue & be in the possession of my Beloved Daughter Patsey Sledge untill either of the periods above mentioned.

7th Item. I give to my Beloved Grand Daughter Betsy Sledge, Daughter to Patsey Sledge. My Negroe girl Milley to be delivered to her when she arrives to the age of Sixteen years or marries – which said negro Milly is to continue & be in the possession of my Beloved Daughter Patsey Sledge until either of the periods above mentioned.

8th Item. I give to my Beloved Grandson Hiram Sledge. My Negro girl Dilse to be Delivered to Him at the age of twenty one years or marries which Negro Dilso is to continue & be in the possession of my Beloved Daughter Patsey Sledge until either of the periods above mentioned and my Negro boy Andrew I give to my three Grand Children Jincy Sledge, Betsy Sledge & Hiram Sledge all three an Equal Interest.

9th Item. I lend to my Beloved Daughter in Law Dolly Chappel, my Plantation whereon she now lives during her widowhood or until the youngest child she now has arrives to Lawful age to raise the Children on. I do also give to my Beloved Grand Children that is to say, Absalom H. Chappel, Joseph J. Chappel, Henry Chappel, & Benjamin T. Chappel in Equal Interest with each other, my two Negroes Jinny & Phillis with all their future Interests, to be taken care of for them by my Executors until they arrive to lawful age or marries & if neither of them arrives to that Period, then the said Negroes to descend to my Lawfull Representatives in Equal Degree. And last of all I make constitute & ordain this my last will & Testament with appointing my Beloved sons Benjamin Chappel, John Chappel & Thomas Chappel my Executors thereto in testimony, whereof I have unto set my hand & affix my seal this tenth day of December in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred & seven. Test. Walter Hamilton Signed John Chappell (Seal) Wm. Wright Wm. Clark Inventory of estate signed 29th January 1808.

John and Nanny were the parents of Elizabeth, Thomas, Joseph, Benjamin, and John Chappell.  Elizabeth was born in 1759. Thomas Chappell was born in 1761 in Sussex.  He married Lavina Cox in 1797 and died in Hancock County, Georgia.   Abraham Chappell was born in 1810 in Hancock Georgia and he married Polly Heath.  He had three brothers, John, George and Joseph, and was probably a grandson of John and Nancy.

James Chappell married Mary Harris in Sussex County.  James was born in 1740 in Sussex and died in 1781 in Prince Fredericks County, South Carolina.

James served in the Revolution and is listed as a patriot of South Carolina, but also by the D.A.R. as coming from Virginia.  James was known as James, the younger, to differentiate him from his Uncle James, Sr, and cousin, James Jr.

In 1758 James, the younger, bought 475 acres from William Hall.  He also received 125 acres on Occhineachy Neck from his father when he died in 1749.  In 1758, James sold 147 acres to William Tomlinson, in Sussex.  Then in October, 1760, James conveyed a tract of 385 acres of land in Sussex, Virginia to William Mason, son of Major John Mason.  The deed further states that James Chappell, at the time the deed was made, was a minor.  The deed was executed in Prince Fredrick’s Parish, South Carolina.

Prince Fredericks Parish was located in the area known as the Georgetown District in the northeastern portion of the state.  In 1766 James Chappell was granted 100 acres on a branch of the Saludy River in what became Colleton County.  In 1770 he obtained 300 acres in what became Craven County on the west side of the Waccamaw River on Maple Swamp.

James had three sons, Charles, Henry and Thomas.  James died in 1781.  His sons Charles and Henry were reported to have died in the Revolution.  Clearly they were very young men.  His first child was probably born about 1760.  Charles was killed while a member of the company of Rangers who were sent to capture Tory “Bloody Bill Cunningham.”  Thomas removed to Edgefield County after the war and settled on the banks of the Saluda River about one mile from the town of Chappell.  He married Delia Hazel.  Their descendents lived in Edgefield and Newberry Counties of South Carolina.  Thomas and Delia Chappell were the parents of Henry (known as Colonel Harry Chappell), Elizabeth born in 1785, who married Drury T. Vaughn, Charles, Frances who married James Hill, Lucinda who married Zachary Payne, and John who married Betsy Brooks.

Benjamin Chappell married Elizabeth.  In 1760 a deed from Benjamin Chappell and wife Elizabeth of Northampton County, North Carolina to his brother Robert, orphan of Samuel Chappell, conveyed the land left to Benjamin in his father’s will filed in Sussex County.  The deed book index for Halifax County, North Carolina indicates Drury Gee also purchased land located in Halifax County from Benjamin Chappell some time between 1760 and 1770.  Evidently he left the area as there does not appear to be any further record of him in the Carolinas or Georgia.

Robert Chappell was born September 21, 1740 in Sussex.  He died in 1770 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia.   In 1751 Robert stood as godparent for his brother John and wife Nanny, and also for Joseph and Sarah Heath.  In 1760 Robert was deeded land in Sussex by his brother Benjamin Chappell.  In 1764 Robert Chappell of Halifax, North Carolina issued a deed to Robert Jones, Jr.  This was probably the land Robert had inherited upon the death of his mother in 1761.  It was near the plantation of Robert Jones and the land deeded to him by his brother Benjamin which adjoined it and was also probably sold to Jones.  Robert is noted in the deed index for Halifax County which covers the period 1761 to 1770.

A family tradition, as reported by Philip Chappell, states that Robert and his brother John went to Mecklenburg County, Virginia where Robert died in 1770, at about age thirty.  This was the year that John and Nancy Chappell issued a deed in Granville County selling their land in Sussex.  Granville County, North Carolina lies just across the border from Mecklenburg County, Virginia.  According to the family tradition Robert’s widow went to Granville with John and Nancy.  Evidently she and her family did not stay for long.  Robert had only one son, Samuel, who was born in 1760.

Samuel stated in a deposition that he resided in Wake County at the out break of the Revolution.  He was sixteen when he enlisted in December, 1776 and was a private in Wade’s Company, 9th Regiment, under Col. Williams. The records indicated that Samuel’s enlistment in 1776 lasted until February, 1780.  In September of 1778 he was reorganized into the 1st N. C. Continental Line in Lt. Col. Mebane’s Company, under Col. Thomas Clark.  He re-enlisted in April 1781 and served until April 1782 as a Sergeant in the 10th Regiment under Col Abraham Shepard.  According to the story related by his son Edward, Samuel served at Trenton, and Brandywine.  He was wounded at Brandywine and taken to Philadephia where his wound was dressd and where he remained until well enough to return to his duties.  He later was a participant at Princeton, Monmouth and Stony Point.  In the Spring of 1780 the Southern Troops were transferred to General Clinton and sent to defend South Carolina.  In May Charleston fell and the troops were placed aboard prison ships in Charleston Harbor.  Eventually most were paroled after promising to go home and not fight any more.  Samuel carried mail for the troops and he escaped from the British while doing this.  He made his way to Granville County where he enlisted in the North Carolina Militia under General Green.  The troops retreated across the Dan River to Guilford Court House in March 1781.  This was a decisive battle.  Samuel transferred from the militia to the regulars for battle and was severely wounded  He recovered and was at the Battle of Eutaw Springs in South Carolina, “…which he always said was the hardest fought battle in which he ever engaged.”  Samuel then marched to Yorktown where he watched Cornwallis surrender in 1781.

In 1821 Samuel testified on behalf of the heirs of two soldiers wh had died a Valley Forge so that their families could receive the land bounties due them.  Samuel returned to Wake County and married Mary Pollard. They lived on the Neuse River near the mouth of Beaver Dam.  In 1800 Samuel bought a farm in Granville County on Ledge of Rock Creek.

Samuel and Mary were the parents of Mary who married her cousin David Chappell,  Susan who married Lawrence Keith, Benjamin, Ann Elizabeth who married Aaron Shearson, William who married Ann Sykes, Edward who married Sarah Robertson, Richard who married Ann Inscore, Samuel who married Cynthia Sorrell, and Nancy who married James Sykes.

Robert Chappell

According to his descendents, Robert was a merchant and Indian trader in what became Petersburg.  Petersburg was founded by William Byrd of Westover and Peter Jones.  He first married Mary about 1710 in Charles City. His second wife was Sarah Cox and she died in 1758 in Amelia County.

Robert wrote his will and it was filed in February 1724.  In his will Robert Chappell left  …to son Robert forty shillings in cash, one bed, my gun and wearing appwerell, my horse Turk, with saddle and furniture, three cows and calves and my negro boy Dick to be delivered to him at the age of 21 years.  … To Sarah, one bed, forty shillings in cash and a negro girl named Frank to be delivered when she is of the age of 21.  To daughter Mary a negro girl named Jenny, to son John five pounds, cash, and a negro girl named Patt…. Robert left his wife Sarah three negroes, three horses, a side saddle, furniture, and 39 pounds cash.  His daughter Ann received 3 pounds cash and with sister Mary their father’s mere and any foals.  Robert then wrote …As I have no more negroes that I give all my children one, it is my pleasure that of the first increase that lives of all those before mentioned negroes, I give one to my daughter Ann, and another to my youngest son James.  The remainder of Robert’s estate went to Sarah which included cattle, sheep and hogs, and she was made executrix.

Robert and Mary were the parents of John, Mary, Sarah, Ann, and Robert.   Robert and Sarah were the  parents of James.

Some time between 1740 and 1745 Sarah Chappell remarried to William Crawley.  They had a son William and about 1746 moved to the area which became Amelia County.  Amelia County was formed in 1734 from a portion of Prince George and Brunswick Counties. Sarah Chappell Crawley died in 1758 and Robert Chappell, Jr. witnessed her will and was mentioned in it.  The wills of Robert Jr., John and James Chappell were also filed in Amelia County.

John Chappell was born in 1712 in Prince George County and died in Amelia County.

John resided in Amelia County where he had five sons.  Tradition states that four of these sons went to Halifax County, Virginia after the Revolutionary War, or about 1781-82.  In 1782 Robert, James and John were noted in Halifax.  In 1799 William Chappell, possibly the fourth son, or a grandson, advertised a notice for a lost pocket book in Halifax County with notes for five hogshead of tobacco passed at Davis’ inspection at Blandford.

Robert Chappell was born in 1716 in Prince George County and he died after 1700 in Amelia County.  He married Elizabeth Cocke, the daughter of Abraham Cocke of Prince George County.  In 1725 Abraham Cocke deeded to Robert Chappell 200 acres …lying and being on the upper side of Oquitt’s Branch adjoining John Banister on Hatcher’s Run. Robert went to Amelia County with his family where he witnessed the will of his mother in 1758.  In 1799 Robert made a gift deed to his daughter Mary Mayes of his seven slaves.  That same year he sold 180 acres to William Crawley, his half brother.  Evidently, having put his house in order, an aged Robert lived his remaining years in the home of his daughter Mary Mayes.  Robert and Elizabeth were the parents of Abraham, who died in Chesterfield; Robert who died in 1794 in Lunenburg County; Mary who married a Mayes.

Abraham was born in 1729 in Charles City County and died in Chesterfield County, Virginia.  He was the father of ten children, including: Robert D., James, William, and James.

Robert Chappell married Martha.  Robert and Martha settled in Lunenburg County by 1765. Robert died in 1794 and his will noted these children: Robert, Jr. who died in 1824 in Lunenburg County, John, and Molly who married Anderson Bagby and Betsey who married Samuel Watkins.  Robert Chappell, Jr. was witness in 1817 to the will of Jesse Gee, son of Charles Gee II of Surry and his wife Bridget Nevill.  He was one of the Justices of the County Court of Lunenburg in 1804, 1817, 1820-22.  In 1804 he was elected to be a member of the General Assembly of Virginia.  This position had previously been held by Sterling Neblett, husband of Mary Chappell, the daughter of James Chappell Jr. and Elizabeth Briggs.  Their son, Dr. Sterling Neblett, served with Robert Chappell from 1812-1815 as delegates to the General Assembly from Lunenburg.  Robert Jr.’s will in 1824 mentioned his mother Martha who remarried to Rueben Rogers in 1800 and son Robert and brother John.

James Chappell married Pheobe Archer, and then Susan Hudson.  James lived in Amelia County where he fathered twelve children.  Tradition states James died from a fever contracted while working in a mill race.  James Chappell was the father of sons Abner, John, Robert, and Bob who were noted in the 1800 tax list.

50 Responses

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  1. Chappell said, on January 3, 2011 at 10:03 pm

    I found your site quite by accident and found this reading to be very interesting as I was married to a John Chappell and have a son named John Clinton Chappell after his father. John Sr. was living in Salem, Oregon. He was named after his father, John. Dad John was from Arkansas, I think. Just was interesting as he had seven sons with some of the same names mentioned in your site here. God bless. Thank you for a good evening’s reading. Darlene

  2. geesnmore said, on January 25, 2011 at 7:29 pm

    Philip Chappell’s book on the Chappell Family
    A genealogical history of the Chappell, Dickie, and other kindred families of Virginia, 1635-1900
    http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=11624

    • Morgan Livingston said, on May 3, 2013 at 11:53 am

      Phillip Chappell was my great great great great Uncle. I have a copy of this book annotated by my grandmother, Harriet Litchfield Livingston. I was wondering if you have any information going back earlier than Robert Chappell in Nottinghamshire. I’ve read that the Chappell family dates to the 10th century in France but cannot find any reliable reference for it.

      • geesnmore said, on May 3, 2013 at 5:29 pm

        I’m sorry… all I know is posted. Good luck..

      • Rebecca Reffitt said, on June 18, 2014 at 5:36 pm

        hi my name is rebecca and i have the information dating back to 1066. I’m of the Chappell family,

  3. geesnmore said, on January 26, 2011 at 8:09 pm

    Obituary Major Hicks Chappell “At his residence in Richland District (S.C.) on the 11th ult. Major Hicks Chappell, aged 80 years, a native of Brunswick County. Published May 19, 1836.
    Note: information in obituaries are only as accurate as the knowledge of the person who provide it. I have seen 1757, 1758, as well as the notation that his headstone reads 1759. It seems clear that Major Hicks Chappell died in 1836.
    5 Mar 1759 in Brunswick Co., Virginia – “A History of Richland Co.” p35-6
    Obituary Elizabeth Chappell, widow of Maj. Hick Chappell: published July 8, 1841:
    Died, on the 4th instant, in this place, Mrs. Elizabeth Chappell, relict of the late Major Hicks Chappell, in the 81st year of her age. She had been a member of the Baptist Church for upwards of thirty years, and was exemplary in all the relations of life.
    This places her birth in 1760.

  4. Janet Washbon said, on March 25, 2011 at 12:57 pm

    I have been researching the identity of Capt. William Barker for the last five years. I have seen several references asserting a familial relationship between John Chappell and William Barker. One of these suggestions is that the Mary Barker who is married to John Chappell is the sister of William Barker, mariner. I have not yet found evidence of this relationship. Is it actually established by one or more records that William Barker, mariner is the brother of John Chappell’s wife Mary?

  5. Mary Chappel DeVore said, on June 16, 2011 at 10:19 pm

    I enjoyed reading all of the history. I am looking for my great,great,great grandfather William H. Chappel born in New York in 1813. He married Miranda Read in Va. in 1843 Lived in Va. during the 1850 census. Died in Ks. in 1854. I can not find his parents or and of his immediate family. He named his children George N., Dwight Ripley, Mary A. , Benjamin, and Charles Lysander.If any one could help I would appreciate it very much.

  6. joyce gathright said, on August 9, 2011 at 11:11 am

    i’m looking for the chappel heath connections to fletcher family who removed from north hampton to mississippi….
    allied also to quinn and fondren.
    the chappel and heath names carried down a long way and accross the country a long way ! !

  7. Barbara Clay Helton said, on September 5, 2011 at 7:39 pm

    I’m looking for more information on Mary Chappell who married a
    Clay. I believe she married Obediah Clay and they had a son named Thomas Chappell Clay. I’m looking for more information on any other children they had, or the children of Thomas Chappell Clay. I’ve traced my Clay ancestry back to my gg grandfather, who named one of his sons Isaac Chappell Clay. You can see why I think there is a connection.

    • Jane Pittenger said, on May 1, 2013 at 3:50 pm

      I am a descendant of Obediah Clay by daughter, Mary. I will be happy to share what info I have.

  8. Theodore Palmer said, on October 19, 2011 at 5:34 pm

    Thank you very much for the Chappell family history. I just learned last year that I am a decendent of Hicks Chappell. I spent a lot of time at the plantation home in Hopkins, SC. My Dad, Stephen Deveaux Palmer, grew up in that house. I even have a potty chair, china cabinet, and 8 foot tall cabinet that came out of the Hicks Chappell home. It was a true when the house burned down after a lightning strike.

  9. Beverly Chappell Cruise said, on October 25, 2011 at 8:01 am

    The Drury Who married Sally Sexton Was not the same Drury born to Samuel and Elizabeth. He Was born in 1778 and is my ggggrandfather. The two drurys are often confused. His parents are not known. The Ancil and Charlotte you mentioned as relatives in Wake Co. are his siblings. Possibly Daniel and John, also.

  10. Jason chappell said, on December 24, 2011 at 1:33 pm

    Great history,is there more?

    • geesnmore said, on December 24, 2011 at 9:28 pm

      Original: A genealogical history of the Chappell, Dickie, and other kindred families of Virginia: 1900: Philip Edward Chappell

      A genealogical history of the Chappell, Dickie, and other kindred families:
      1635-1900, the Hix Chappell lineage to 1983: Phil Edward Chappell, Eloise Martin Chappell

  11. Dustin said, on December 27, 2011 at 12:44 pm

    Great research. I a descendant of WIlliam Chappell (son of John Chappell and Mary Hines) and Margret Cooper. William and Margaret apparently immigrated from Virginia to Georgia where their daughter Sarah Chappell was born in 1801. I was hoping to find any information on William and Mary’s migration to Georgia specifically, or anything on that family in general. Many thanks for your hard work.

  12. Kelly said, on February 3, 2012 at 3:52 pm

    Loved reading your family history. I am looking for another branch, and believe the earliest records show my 4x great-grandfather, Jeremiah Chapel/Chappell/Chappel/Chappelle (have seen all spellings throughout family line) in Amelia Co. VA, then Chester Co. SC. He likely migrated through GA & AL before settling in western KY. He was born on 16 Dec 1776. He died on 30 Nov 1837 in Hopkins Co.KY. He married Sarah Franklin. She was born on 31 Aug 1790. She died on 26 Jul 1833 in Hopkins Co. KY. Arriving in Ky. with him were (brothers?) Stephen & John. There were many land transactions & marriages between these Chapels, Franklins, & McGregors (as well as public “affrays”), & all seemed to follow the same route to Ky. Jeremiah & Sarah had 12 children (James, Thomas, Caleb, Nancy, Mary & Rachel (twins), Sarah, Marget (?), Eunice, Gaines Jeremiah, Asel, and Martha. If you happen to have found any information in your research with these family names, I would appreciate any leads concerning the origins of Jeremiah, Stephen, and John. I have good info for the more recent generations, but it’s cloudy prior to their arrival in Ky. (probably 1805-1810, according to Ky. land grants). Thank you!

    • geesnmore said, on February 3, 2012 at 6:14 pm

      No information, sorry. Good luck!

  13. Jason Chappell said, on February 3, 2012 at 6:21 pm

    I am grateful you posted this information. It makes a lot of sense that my fathers name was Stephen Franklin. I have looked for public records and come up short most of the time. Any links you think would be helpful would sincerely be appreciated.

    • Kelly Knight said, on September 23, 2012 at 4:33 am

      I have a good file of Franklins, who had a history of marrying Chappels. There are good marriage records @ kykinfolk. Hopkins, Christian, and Caldwell Co. links may give some results. Think that both families came from the Carolinas, through Alabama.

  14. Rachel Chappell said, on February 23, 2012 at 12:08 am

    I’m a Chappell. Daughter of Ralph Elliot Chappell of both North Carolina, and Virginia, I believe. Granddaughter of Patricia Chappell and William Chappell of North Carolina.

    Since my father chose not to be in my life, research is all I have to tell me about that side of the family and of my own roots, sadly.

    I find it all very interesting as I’m a history buff anyway, but it’s especially dear to me when I might be reading about one of my own ancestors.

  15. Christopher Logan said, on February 25, 2012 at 1:22 pm

    I’m looking for Mary Chappell Russell, who married Reuben Ellis in 1836 in Copiah Co. Miss.

  16. Barbara Chappell said, on March 15, 2012 at 8:18 am

    Any information on Eliza / Lizzie Chappell wife of Richard Plummer . In 1880 they lived in Cople, Westmoreland, Virginia. A son named James born Oct. 14, 1871 in Mecklenburg, Virginia.

  17. Karen Buckley said, on August 23, 2012 at 5:17 pm

    I am looking for the parents of John Chappell who fought in the revolutionary war and died in Fairfax, Co. VA. he was married to Mary Yeaman.(Yayman) I did not see him mentioned on this site.

    • geesnmore said, on August 25, 2012 at 3:30 pm

      Try my main sources: A genealogical history of the Chappell, Dickie, and other kindred families of Virginia: 1900: Philip Edward Chappell

      A genealogical history of the Chappell, Dickie, and other kindred families:
      1635-1900, the Hix Chappell lineage to 1983: Phil Edward Chappell, Eloise Martin Chappell

  18. JLove said, on September 10, 2012 at 2:26 pm

    Wow, with one mention of Martha Chappell marrying a Love, I found a whole new leg of my family. How cool!

    • Kelly Knight said, on September 23, 2012 at 4:47 am

      Still trying to find a connection with these Chappels – I have a William Love Chapel, born in MO, 1842 – Grandson of my 4x gr-g’pa Jeremiah (where I dead-end), and son of Thomas & Mary (Bishop) Chapel. Some of the middle names are where I’m turning next – could be relevant family names: Love, Green, Fellows, Gaines…

  19. Nancy Cosby said, on December 24, 2012 at 12:10 am

    My grandmother was Valda Erin Chappell (1898-1976), daughter of Samuel Chappell (1873-1898) and Nancy Eleanor Long (ca.1866-1929), They were living in Jackson County, Florida when Samuel died (murdered, according to family lore) and I cannot trace his ancestry. Does anyone have anything on Samuel?

  20. Christine Manczuk said, on April 1, 2013 at 6:49 pm

    Awesome post! I am descended from John Chappell (abt 1736 – 1785) and Nannie. I greatly appreciate all your work :-)

  21. Adam Chappell said, on April 4, 2013 at 8:42 pm

    I’m a Chappell that still lives in Virginia. I’ve looked up my family history on Ancestry.com, and the farthest it goes back to is a one Marion Columbus Chappel (my 3rd great grandfather), born in North Carolina in 1838, with one of his sons named Franklin Parks Chappell. Any info on him?

  22. Robert Barnes said, on April 5, 2013 at 7:34 pm

    I loved reading about the Chappell family. My family is from Amelia County, Va. while researching I came across a curious connection to the Chappell Family. My Family name is Barnes. In 1812 William Barnes married Mary Vaden. In 1823 their children, Capt. James Henry Barnes and his sister Ann Elizabeth were given into guardianship to a James Chappell. I have never heard of any connection between these families. I have found a reference to a marriage of James Chappell and Nancy Vaden in 1806. Are you aware of any connection?

  23. mark wright said, on April 8, 2013 at 10:42 pm

    my family is from Missouri and claims to be descended from thomas who came on the “America” .

  24. Mark Chappell Thomas said, on April 12, 2013 at 1:54 pm

    I am Mark Chappell Thomas from Florida–my mother was Hazel Chappell, my grandfather was Benjamin Chappell married to my g’mother Mamie Knight Chappell–he was a tobacco farmer from Fuquay Springs, NC–his Father moved to southern wake co to escape the “Creedmore wilt”-ground gave out(no crop rotation)-Originally they came from the tidewater area–kept moving to “new ground”–I have the Chappell Dickey book-interested in finding out more about my grandmother Mamie Knight (Chappell)–many Knights married Chappells.

  25. Christopher Logan said, on May 1, 2013 at 9:49 pm

    Anyone have a Chappell connect to Gillespie (or Gilaspia or Gelispie, etc…)??

  26. Karen Buckley said, on May 2, 2013 at 5:15 am

    I am looking for John Chappell, a revolutionary war soldier who served with Thomas Ewell in the 1st Regiment of Virginia of Col. George Gibson and Lt. Col William Brent, who died in fairfax county, Va. He was married to Mary Yayman. He died in Fairfax county in 9 April 1835. trying to find who his parents were. does anyone have this information?

  27. Ted Heath said, on July 11, 2013 at 8:51 pm

    I am looking for information on the Heath-Chappell connections. You reference “The Heath Family” several times. Can you provide the name of the author or a link to where the reference can be found or where it may be purchased? Thank you!

    • geesnmore said, on July 12, 2013 at 6:37 pm

      “The Heath Family” is a work in progress… I am not prepared to publish it at this time.

      • Ted Heath said, on July 28, 2013 at 7:04 am

        Kathryn: Thank you. When you do publish, please keep me in mind. Your research has been very helpful on the Gee-Heath-Chappell lines. A question between now and then. Does your research include any Richard Heath born in NC between 1774-1784; died in Rutherford, TN in 1852; possibly married to a Rebecca. Children include – James S (my line), Richard, Henry, Rebecca, Temperance. Thank you! Ted Heath

  28. Kayla Chappell said, on August 1, 2013 at 6:09 pm

    I’m Kayla Chappell and I’m 18. I live in Michigan. My dad’s name is Thomas Herbert Chappell II and my grandfather is Thomas Herbert Chappell I. I’m not sure if I’m connected to this article but I saw a company called Chappell & Co. It was a music label that also sold pianos. The company originated from France but its heasquarters was then moved to England where it was bought by the Warner Bros. I was wondering if any one had any info on this particular branch of Chappells

  29. Barbara H. Smith said, on August 5, 2013 at 8:08 am

    I am a descendant of Elizabeth Jones (daughter of James Jones Sr) of Charles City, Virginia and her second husband, Thomas Taylor. It’s interesting because their descendants donated the land for Columbia,SC to be established as the capitol of SC. Her descendants with her first husband, Thomas Chappell founded the town of Chappells, SC where I’m originally from. My daughter now lives in Charles City, not far from where James Jones’ plantation was on the James River.
    Here’s my question…I have that James Jones Sr was born in 1640 and died in 1719. I have seen Elizabeth’s birth dates ranging anywhere from 1650 to 1670, and marriage dates to Thomas Chappell ranging from 1677 to 1680. I am totally confused. Do you have any information on this family line? I would greatly appreciate any help and guidance. Thank you for your help! Barbara Holloway Smith

    • geesnmore said, on August 6, 2013 at 7:44 pm

      The only firm date is his death in 1719… all other dates are estimations based on things like average ages for marriage, ages of children, etc. No one knows for certain on Thomas or Elizabeth. If your daughter is in Charles City, have her visit the local historical society in Prince George and Surrey Counties, as they are the real experts.

  30. Tracey barker said, on October 6, 2013 at 11:10 am

    I am not a chappell, but I have a grandfather clock made by a Thomas Chappell in tower street London, in the mid 1700’s would he be related to any of you, tracey

  31. Jess Daniel Sims said, on March 12, 2014 at 9:01 am

    I’m not sure if this is the same family but my grandmother’s maiden name is Chappell and she was from Virginia.
    Her name was Elizabeth Chappell Nickols. Any insight?

  32. Paul David said, on April 12, 2014 at 4:43 pm

    Love reading the history of the Chappell. My wife’s connection is to a Henry Chappell in West Virginia. He was born in 1804. My side of family is the Anderson’s of Amelia County, VA. My grandfather was born in 1859 in Boydton, VA. Too many cross locations.

  33. Julia Chappelle-Thomas said, on June 17, 2014 at 8:15 am

    I have really enjoyed reading your website. I am descended from the Maryland branch of Chappells and have been sorting out our line from the Virginia line since 1985, off and on. I like your straightforward approach to the complex subject matter. Best wishes for your continued success.

    Julia Chappelle-Thomas
    (descendant of Henry and Euphane Chappell of Montgomery Co., Maryland through son Thomas Chappell and wife Eleanor Harvey)

    • geesnmore said, on June 17, 2014 at 12:18 pm

      Thanks, I appreciate the compliment.
      Kathryn

  34. Calvin Chappelle said, on July 4, 2014 at 7:31 am

    Great site! In your research, have you discovered an Abram Chappell? Abram Chappell was my 4th G-Grandfather and first appears in the records in 1845 when he married Elizabeth Candler (daughter of William Candler and Nancy Lacy)in Chambers Co. AL. Abram Chappell had four sons: William Jackson (1844) whose wife was Mary E Hulsey; John Henry (1847-1926) who married Saphronia Amanda Lynn; Charley S. (1852) who married Mary A. Elkins; and George Washington(1860) who married Nancy Bell Price. Any information would be helpful. Our family has tried for years to determine Abram’s parents. That is our missing link. The “e” was added to our name several generations back. Thanks! – Calvin Chappelle – calvin.chappelle@gmail.com

    • geesnmore said, on July 5, 2014 at 9:39 am

      Thank you for the compliment. I did not go into that period of time to any extent. Try these volumes: A genealogical history of the Chappell, Dickie, and other kindred families of Virginia: 1900: Philip Edward Chappell
      A genealogical history of the Chappell, Dickie, and other kindred families:
      1635-1900, the Hix Chappell lineage to 1983: Phil Edward Chappell, Eloise Martin Chappell

      I believe they are still available online.
      Kathryn

  35. Christopher Logan said, on July 5, 2014 at 10:12 am

    Hello Katherine!

    You mention Chappell and Dickie together in Virginia. Apparently a John Russell married Nancy Dickie, possibly in Augusta County, Virginia. My Isham Russell, Sr., may be John’s brother. Isham, Jr. named his first child Mary Chappell Russell. I’ve not yet found out why. Any clues?

    Blessings
    Chris


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